Breastfeeding twins as an active mom

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Photo by Amy Stewart Photography

When our twins turned six months old, it was supposed to be a joyous milestone. We kept these two little souls fed, happy and thriving for half a year! We made it through the toughest days and nights of our lives! And they have brought so much love and happiness to our home.

Instead, at their six-month appointment, we found out that Leo’s weight had plateaued at about 12.5 lbs. He weighed the same as he did at five months. Leo, who was my biggest twin at birth at 6 lbs, 15 oz, was dropping off his growth curve.

A feeling of heat rose through my chest and into my cheeks. Most mothers know it: a wrenching combination of guilt and fear.

I automatically blamed myself and my new quest to clean up my health and my eating. I worried that my workouts at 3rd Degree Training may have depleted my milk supply. At that point I was about halfway through the eight-week boot camp.

My family doctor did not blame me (even though I didn’t mention I had started a new exercise program). She simply suggested increasing the amount of solid foods the twins receive to three times a day. We also talked about giving them a bit of formula at night, something my doctor said was entirely up to me.

I have continued with my nutrition plan and working out four times a week at 3rd Degree throughout the past month, and while I have lost a few pounds and inches, both Leo and Callum have porked it on. All the while, I have continued breastfeeding them, along with increased solid foods and a couple ounces of formula at bedtime (in addition to breastmilk). It was always my goal to make it to six months of breastfeeding, but all three of us enjoy it, and since it has become so ingrained in our routines, I really want to keep going.

Now I can say with confidence that I know I did nothing wrong. Exercise should not negatively impact the quantity or quality of supply (unless there is a serious calorie deficit or dehydration). Exercise is good for both mom and baby, in so many ways.

I have taken great care to ensure I am consuming plenty of calories (1,000 more than the average woman!) and three litres of water. I am eating whole, real food, and I eat six times a day. I still eat bread (whole grains) and dairy, and eat plenty of protein, fruit, vegetables and healthy fats such as yogurt, nuts and avocado.

I know Leo and Callum are thriving, happy babies. They are content, they don’t fuss while nursing, they sleep relatively well and they love to eat. After searching some mom forums, I have discovered that many babies go through a weight plateau just before starting solids. And I remember Silas going through something similar as well. I started running regularly when he was about five months old.

I want other breastfeeding moms to know that it is fine to exercise, so go ahead and do it. Don’t feel guilty. It is so good for you (improved cardiovascular health, feelings of well-being and reduced stress, to name a few) and your baby.

That being said, I think it is also good to take your time and ease back into an active lifestyle slowly after childbirth. Kellymom.com recommends waiting until your baby is two months old and you have established a good milk supply before embarking on a weight-loss program. Through both of my experiences nursing newborns, I always feel we have hit our stride by the 3-4 month mark.

After a few days of wallowing in guilt after that five-month appointment, I even started feeling as though breastfeeding our twins was a mistake and that I was holding them back from growing into healthy little babies.

Now I know that is foolishness, and that I continue to give them the very best start I can offer. For me, being an active, healthy mom is a part of the equation.

For more information on postpartum fitness, check out this previous q&a I did with Caroline MacKay, who offers mom/baby fitness classes.

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Taking a leap of faith: exercise as medicine for chronic pain

For most people, including myself, fitness and nutrition is not just about how they look, it’s about how they feel.

Catt Ferguson, co-owner of 3rd Degree Training Saint John, is one of those people. She has suffered from various health conditions from the age of 23, leaving her mentally and physically drained. But over the course of the past year, she has completely changed her life, weaning herself off medications thanks to a careful diet and regular physical activity.

I hope you are as amazed and inspired by her story as I am. Following Catt’s lead, several other members of 3rd Degree with chronic health conditions have also made gains by making physical activity and a healthy eating a priority in their lives.

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Catt Ferguson, co-owner of 3rd Degree Training Saint John

Q: What chronic health issues do you suffer from?

From the age of 23 on, I have always battled some form of chronic illness. As soon as I would be cured of one, a more debilitating one would come along. I currently battle 3 chronic illnesses that affect me on a daily basis and unfortunately, there are no cures in sight. I was diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis in 2008, affecting my chest, knees, hips, fingers, toes, and jaw. I was diagnosed after several visits to hospital with sharp chest pain, in which the rheumatologist explained the source of the pain as inflammation around the lungs or heart. I was also diagnosed with fibromyalgia in February of 2017, although I have battled with the symptoms of chronic widespread pain and chronic fatigue for many years, it was diagnosed through the process of elimination. This year, at the age of 40, I was told that the constant feeling of frostbite in all my extremities and the chilblains on my toes are from Raynaud’s phenomenon or Raynaud’s disease.

Q: How did you discover that exercise could help?

I was generally active throughout my life, in between illnesses you could say. In January 2017, the pain in the shoulders, hips, chest, ribs, neck and severe stiffness in the fingers and toes became a daily thing.  Although I was exhausted thoughout the day, and would fall asleep in the early evening every night but just couldn’t stay asleep. I would wake up after a couple hours from either/ or a combination of pain, overactive thoughts and nightmares, causing days of non-restorative sleep. I was completely overwhelmed and over-stimulated, struggling to keep up with my daily routine, not to mention trying to manage the feeling of being in constant pain. I was prescribed several medications, leaving me with the feeling of being sedated.

As luck would have it, my partner’s passion was fitness. Kevin McEachern bought and set up the 3rd Degree Training/Actual Nutrition franchise in Saint John. He spent all his time instructing and motivating all the fitness classes, which meant if I wanted to see him, I had to spend some time in the studio as well. In his first 8-week round, he would encourage me to participate in the High Intensity Interval Training classes, telling me to work at my own speed and teaching me how to modify certain moves, i.e, using calf extensions as opposed to jumping. While the company was working through its second 8-week round, I increased my workouts to 3 or 4 times a week and by the end of that round, I no longer needed the modifications. I was feeling much stronger, more energetic, happy and accomplished. I made a conscious decision to slowly wean off all the meds that was prescribed to “help” ease the fibromyalgia symptoms and haven’t returned to them. In the following months, I started motivating some of the fitness classes, I became certified to instruct the classes and became a Personal Trainer.

Q: How does eating better help? What dietary restrictions do you have?

I have been lactose intolerant since birth. About 6 years ago, I curved my eating habits to a holistic, anti-inflammatory, whole-food lifestyle however my meals would mostly be snack-size. With the help of my partner, we were able to increase the size of my portions. I remember thinking to myself, “I can’t eat all this, I’ll be sick,” but eventually I started eating regular meals again. Together, we developed a solid eating pattern. Steve Collette, Founder/CEO of the 3rd Degree Training franchise, made a few positive recommendations to help boost my metabolism using the Actual Nutrition program. Now, I have lots of energy to sustain me throughout the day, even after a workout.

Q: How has your life changed?

I’ve gone from being someone dependent on medication, living with chronic widespread pain and surviving on autopilot on a daily basis to someone living life again.

Q: How do you hope others could learn from your story?
I want others to know that they don’t have to be prisoners of their illnesses. I’m not going to lie and say that every day is perfect or that I found a cure and there will never be another flare, but I will say my quality of life has improved drastically. You can spend a lifetime on survival mode or you take a leap of faith, spend a couple of weeks being outside our comfort zone, developing a routine, getting back to living a longer, healthier life and thriving.

I am a Fibro warrior and an RA warrior. #fibrowarrior #RAwarrior

Organized chaos: how the gym makes me feel more human

From the moment I peel open my eyes in the morning until those sweet first seconds of uninterrupted sleep at night, I am running on all cylinders. I am like a mommy octopus, feeding babies with two tentacles, wiping butts with the other, cleaning up, grocery shopping, you name it.

And hey, I may have six-month-old twins and a three-year-old but I am not so different from many busy mothers out there, and I know it. In fact in the past few months I have gained even more mad respect for all the stay-at-home moms I know who toil through these emotional and tedious and beautiful days for years on end.

I am also blessed to have loads of help, with part-time childcare for Silas, and my husband’s shifts allowing him to be home during the day.

But for me, one of the hardest things about maternity leave is when the fatigue and the feeling of being needed 24/7 wears you down so that you stop caring. You stop caring about what you look like, what you are putting in your mouth, and how much you are exercising. Two babies crying frantically can raise anyone’s blood pressure. Add a “Mooooommmm! I need you!” and burning supper, and you suddenly find yourself mindlessly pounding Skittles or Decadent cookies and pouring yet another coffee.

Getting myself on a workout routine and eating better has absolutely changed how I respect and care for my body and my health. It has been about so much more than losing pounds or inches, it has been about taking control over one aspect of my life when most others are truly dictated by my children and their ever-evolving needs.

Over the past three weeks, I have cut all the garbage and “treats” I had started to lean on way too much to get through the day (and night). Filling up on veggies, protein, complex carbs and healthy fats has provided me with stable energy throughout the day, and I rarely feel ravenous!

Taking part in HIIT workouts at 3rd Degree Training gets me out of the house and into an energy-filled environment where it’s impossible not to leave in a better mood. By attending just four classes a week since late February, I am already starting to feel stronger. I’m excited to see how much progress I make by the end of this eight-week bootcamp.

My goal is not to be skinny; it’s to be a happy, healthy mom better able to take the ups and downs of parenting three young children. I love myself more when I feel healthy and strong. These days with my three little ones are fleeting and I don’t want to waste them in a fog, if I can help it.